If you consistently don't like the outcome, you must change the rules of the game.

Big box stores occupy acres of valuable land in our towns with their large-scale buildings and even larger parking lots. This is land that generates far less tax revenue per acre than traditional commercial development. In spite of their low productivity, big box stores benefit from tax subsidies, regulatory advantages and extensive public infrastructure investments. They are perfectly adapted to take advantage of the un-level playing field that is the American economy.

Big box stores fail to generate true wealth in our communities. They are designed to siphon money out of our towns, not build wealth within. They turn, for example, the local owner of the shoe store into the manager of the shoe department, with massive ramifications for wealth creation. Yet, many cities are forced to take the big box -- even fight for it -- lest it end up in the neighboring city. This isn't a free market. We've created a destructive game where the prime casualty is the financial solvency of our cities, towns and neighborhoods.


Help us create a national database on big box productivity

We're creating a comprehensive, crowdsourced database that will examine tax productivity comparing big box stores like Walmart with compact, downtown buildings. We’re working closely with our friends at Urban3 to make this a downloadable resource and map the results. 


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Check out our campaign to end parking minimums and learn why big parking lots are bad for our financial prosperity and built environment.



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