Our current national land use, transportation, and funding systems are bankrupting the country. We can either begin to have an adult conversation about how to redirect our efforts to a more resilient and durable set of arrangements or we can sit back and watch things fail in messy and unpleasant ways.

Strong Towns is the only organization I know of that articulates our present reality in a reasonable and measured way that doesn’t immediately resort to scapegoats or fantasies of quick fixes.

There are no “solutions”. But there are intelligent responses.
— John Sanphillippo of San Francisco, CA

Join these members and hundreds of others across the country in advocating for stronger cities, towns and neighborhoods.


Some good friends at the Strong Towns National Gathering helping to shape the movement.

Some good friends at the Strong Towns National Gathering helping to shape the movement.

Charles Marohn demonstrated the facts in a way that my thirst for more got a serious kick start. I found numerous other sources of information through the Strong Towns website, started attending more local seminars and classes, was chosen for a spot in a regional program, attended CNU22 and the Strong Towns Boot Camp here in Buffalo, and have managed to get myself to a spot that I really feel that I have something to offer locally and farther.

I have become involved in the “One Region Forward” movement here in Buffalo-Niagara which has given me the ability to now lead my village in a complete rewrite of our zoning code.
— Jill Rohring of Wilson, NY

Jeremy Murdock, Mississippi State, kicking off a week of Curbside Chats across the state.

Jeremy Murdock, Mississippi State, kicking off a week of Curbside Chats across the state.

We’re starting to have what Strong Towns calls the “mature conversation” about what we can realistically afford, whether or not we can depend on state or county subsidies, and whether we can have a sufficient local tax base to support our desire for lots of government-provided amenities.

A group of residents is launching an independent economic development forum and our city has budgeted for economic development for the first time. We’ve started emphasizing better bike lanes, sidewalks, and crosswalks to help rebuild attractive streetscapes.

It’s just a start, but we think we’re headed in the right direction after a long period of drift and stagnation. The moral support and analysis from Strongs Towns, as well as learning from the experiences of other places highlighted here, have been very helpful.
— Jeff Lemieux of Greenbelt, MD