For the last couple of years, we have been able to document the annual Congress for the New Urbanism through a series of podcast interviews with Congress attendees. This year, we'll be doing that too, with a slightly different format.  

Until then, it's worth listening to these podcasts from last year's CNU in Dallas. Most are just 30 minutes, and they feature Strong Towns members as well as some new urbanist celebrities. Here are my favorites from last year (click on the header to get to the podcast):

John Anderson and Monte Anderson

John Anderson and Monte Anderson

John Anderson and Monte Anderson

John Anderson and Monte Anderson (no relation, except in good looks) talk about how small, incremental development can save the world and make a nice living for the entrepreneurial startup builder trying to transform their city. John and Monte are all about lowering the bar on entry and their similar stories are compelling.

Lynn Richards

CNU President and CEO Lynn Richards talking about accelerating the pace of change, #IamCNU and ways the Congress for the New Urbanism is leading a movement for building great places.

Jarrett Walker and James Llamas

Jarrett Walker of Jarrett Walker + Associates and James Llamas of Traffic Engineers, Inc. talk about the reimagined Houston transit network, the hard choices that brought it about and how the city's bus network now provides more service to more people with the same budget.

Hazel Borys

Hazel Borys of Placemakers talking about living in a northern city, the spread of form based codes and being a reluctant, but necessary, free range parent.

Verdunity

Kristin Green and Kevin Shepherd from the Dallas-based engineering and planning firm Verdunity talk about doing fiscally-based comprehensive plans, green infrastructure and the CNU Legacy Charettes.

John Simmerman

John Simmerman of Active Towns talks about his move to Austin, the Active Living tour and efforts to slow cars.

Matthias Leyrer

Strong Towns contributor Matthias Leyrer talks about how he got started blogging, how urban renewal hurt his city and the memes he has been sharing on the Strong Towns site.