Small cities and counties, with populations under 20,000 people, have been catastrophically impacted by Hurricane Harvey’s high winds, flooding, and tornados, but do not have access to the same resources as larger cities like Houston. Over 200 of these small communities have received a federal declaration, yet barely have the capacity and necessary resources to build back, much less the expertise to build for a more resilient future. Immediate assistance is needed in these small communities to assess damages and develop plans that will inform the longer term recovery process.

Holiday Lakes, Texas on April 3, 2017 (left) and August 30, 2017 (right) after Hurricane Harvey. (Photo credit: 2017 Digitalglobe via EP)

Holiday Lakes, Texas on April 3, 2017 (left) and August 30, 2017 (right) after Hurricane Harvey. (Photo credit: 2017 Digitalglobe via EP)

Together with the Congress for the New Urbanism (CNU) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Strong Towns is supporting Collaborative Communities' efforts to deploy Free Assistance Support Teams (FAST) to small communities affected by Hurricane Harvey in Texas. 

Through the FAST program, municipal governments will receive free assistance to ensure they have the necessary tools and information to adequately prepare for the FEMA Project Worksheet process. For more detailed information about the Free Assistance Support Team Program, please review the FAST program overview or contact Kristen Dunphey at CNU; kdunphey@cnu.org.

Please consider volunteering your time and expertise or making a financial contribution to ensure that small cities and towns impacted by Hurricane Harvey have the opportunity to rebuild for a more resilient, sustainable, and vibrant future. 

The following buttons will take you to CNU's hub for donating and volunteering as part of the FAST program.

Listen to our podcast interview with Laura Clemons, founder and CEO of Collaborative Communities, to learn more about this effort.

 


(Top photo source: SC National Guard)