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Wide Streets as a Tool of Oppression

Wide Streets as a Tool of Oppression

Wide, straight, monumental streets have always served the interests of those in power. They allow for the mobilization of military force, subordinate the unplanned chaos of the city to grandiose visions, and have been used to dispossess and displace small businesses, the poor, and racial and political minorities.

Learning to Love a Humble Neighborhood

Learning to Love a Humble Neighborhood

Perhaps we should spend more time trying to understand and appreciate the humble, marginally better neighborhoods that are already tucked away in our cities. Here’s one such neighborhood in Lexington, Kentucky.

Mixed Up Priorities for Mixed-Use Buildings

Mixed Up Priorities for Mixed-Use Buildings

Strong, financially resilient neighborhoods emerge organically. Requiring one particular style of construction because we've see it work in other neighborhoods will not achieve this goal.

Where Will Lexington Put 40,000 People?

Where Will Lexington Put 40,000 People?

Lexington, KY offered my young parents an affordable home and a good life decades ago. If we want that opportunity to be available for the next generation, we're going to need to remove a lot of barriers to development.

Towards A Liberal Approach To Urban Form

Towards A Liberal Approach To Urban Form

What we need is not a new and improved vision of urban form but a robust liberal understanding of urban form. This transition involves shifting from thinking of cities as simple machines toward thinking of cities as complex, emergent systems.

How Local Cronyism Hurts America's Cities

How Local Cronyism Hurts America's Cities

American towns and states are subsidizing big businesses to the tune of billions of dollars a year. In exchange, we get crappy, big box developments and infrastructure we can't pay afford.