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Best of 2018: Gentrification and Cataclysmic Money

Best of 2018: Gentrification and Cataclysmic Money

Gentrification and concentrated poverty are two sides of the same coin. We’ve engineered our cities so that neighborhoods get either too much investment or too little: the trickle or the fire hose.

If We Win, You Won't Hear About It

If We Win, You Won't Hear About It

If Strong Towns is successful—really successful—you won't hear about it, because the vast majority of the change we produce won't be attributed to us at all. It will be embedded in the broader culture.

A Guide to Busting Parking Myths in Your Town

A Guide to Busting Parking Myths in Your Town

“There’s no parking around there!” How to hit the streets and collect the data yourself, and figure out whether your neighborhood actually has a parking shortage—or, more likely, an excess.

How Is Strong Towns Different?

How Is Strong Towns Different?

There are a lot of worthy movements and organizations that want your time, energy, and money. Here are some things that set Strong Towns apart.

The Comcast of Transportation?

The Comcast of Transportation?

Two recent articles illuminate a troubling trend toward locking ride-share, bike-share and scooter users onto proprietary platforms, making it harder to plan trips that could really free us from car-dependence.

We Regulate the Wrong Things

We Regulate the Wrong Things

Most cities’ zoning and development regulations obsess over things that are easy to measure, like building height and density, at the expense of the things that actually determine whether we’re building quality places.

The Trade-Offs That Shape Our Cities

The Trade-Offs That Shape Our Cities

Local advocates who are at each others’ throats often have legitimate, but conflicting, aims. Talking about the trade-offs involved isn’t going to make us all start agreeing with each other. But it might make our disagreements more productive.

Value Per Acre Analysis: A How-To For Beginners

Value Per Acre Analysis: A How-To For Beginners

Want to do the kind of value-per-acre analysis that you’ve seen on Strong Towns before, but don’t think of yourself as a data wizard? Here’s a step by step guide for beginners.

The Difference Between Mobility and Accessibility

The Difference Between Mobility and Accessibility

When we obsess over the speed of travel—whether in our cars or on public transit—we’re missing the point of transportation. It’s not about how far you can get in a given time: it’s what you can get to.

Helping Low-Income Homeowners Become Landlords in Denver

Helping Low-Income Homeowners Become Landlords in Denver

A pilot project in Denver aims to help low-income homeowners add accessory dwelling units to their property. If it succeeds, it will help people remain in their communities, build wealth, and deliver affordable homes to a new generation of neighbors.

A Texas-Sized Pavement Problem

A Texas-Sized Pavement Problem

Collin County, Texas officials claim they need $12.6 billion for new roads in the next 30 years, and none of it for maintenance of what they’ve already built. That way lies madness.

Can You Build a Resilient Place from the Ground Up?

Can You Build a Resilient Place from the Ground Up?

Can a master-planned community be consistent with Strong Towns principles of iterative, bottom-up placemaking? We take a tour of Serenbe, Georgia, an experiment in New Urbanism and eco-conscious living on the far outskirts of Atlanta.

Right-Sizing Akron's Kenmore Boulevard

Right-Sizing Akron's Kenmore Boulevard

Akron, Ohio is tackling its stroad problem, one oversized boulevard at a time. “Right-sizing” this neighborhood main street will make it safer and more inviting and hospitable for small businesses.

Austin's Bad Party: The Failure of CodeNEXT

Austin's Bad Party: The Failure of CodeNEXT

Austin’s CodeNEXT process, a dramatic overhaul of the city’s zoning code, tried to placate multiple constituencies with a “grand bargain.” The result was a draft code that satisified almost no one and failed to solve the city’s housing and growth challenges.