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Suburban Poverty

Beginnings, Middles, and Ends

Beginnings, Middles, and Ends

Everything has a beginning, a middle, and an end. Our current institutions are in the process of failing and are unlikely to be reformed. Once the dust settles, we’ll create new institutions and a fresh cultural consensus that respond to pressing needs on the ground.

The Apartment Complex

The Apartment Complex

Affordable housing can take many shapes and show up in surprising places. These places aren’t subsidized or government-run, but they house millions of Americans.

Suburban Poverty Meets Sprawl Retrofit

Suburban Poverty Meets Sprawl Retrofit

Where should we invest in retrofit, and where does it make more sense to let suburban development fail? The answer could have a profound impact on people across America.

The Shape of Things to Come

The Shape of Things to Come

We’ve got the built environment that we have and the overwhelming majority of it isn’t going to change.

Best of 2016: Suburban Poverty

Best of 2016: Suburban Poverty

There is arguably no place where half a century of suburban growth has more resembled a giant Ponzi scheme than in Florida.

The Talisman of Colerain

The Talisman of Colerain

Everything that used to be shiny and new in this town is now aging – not all of it well. This town, like nearly every other town of its vintage, is functionally insolvent.

Suburban. Comma. Transit

Suburban. Comma. Transit

Attempts to upgrade public transit by the central authorities in Los Angeles have been fought tooth and nail by residents, and illustrate why transit just doesn’t work when the local culture doesn’t want it.

Suburban mall banishes bus stop service

Suburban mall banishes bus stop service

In a thinly veiled attempt to keep "those people" out of a local mall, this spring, the Valley West Mall in West Des Moines demanded that a bus stop that services the mall be removed from its property.

A Postcard from Marietta

A Postcard from Marietta

Caution: This post contains graphic images of housing displacement. Viewer discretion is advised.

Why aren't we talking about Marietta?

Why aren't we talking about Marietta?

It’s apparently acceptable for suburbs to actively discourage – and in this case, actually relocate – low-income renters. By pretending this sort of thing only happens in Brooklyn or San Francisco, we leave the low-income households who used to live in these now-demolished Marietta apartments vulnerable to very real displacement.