Staying Strong

Staying Strong

Don’t be intimidated by the haters. Keep doing what you can to build a strong town.

Dealing with Congestion

Dealing with Congestion

Our national transportation obsession has been about maximizing the amount that you can drive. Today, we need to focus on minimizing the amount you are forced to drive.

Gross Negligence

Gross Negligence

In this hard-hitting four-part series, we examine the root cause of America's dangerously designed roads, which take tens of thousands of lives every year.

Who Benefits From Neighborhood Improvements?

Who Benefits From Neighborhood Improvements?

If urbanists want a successful, lasting renaissance of inner-city neighborhoods, they should allow the people who stuck it out through the lean years a controlling stake in their neighborhoods' rebirth.

The Cost of Auto Orientation

The Cost of Auto Orientation

Here's an apples-to-apples comparison of traditional and auto-oriented development approaches. Guess which one is more financially productive.

Lesson Learned

Lesson Learned

A couple years ago, I bought a $15,000 uninhabitable shack in Cincinnati, Ohio, hoping to renovate it into a nice two-story duplex for renters. Here's what went wrong.

The Shopping Mall Death Spiral

The Shopping Mall Death Spiral

Cities that tethered their future to this experiment are going to struggle, while those that still have a pulse in their core neighborhoods will have a chance at renewed prosperity.

The Magic of Tree-Lined Streets

The Magic of Tree-Lined Streets

Whether you care about the environment, property values, public health, or your city’s bottom line, you can make your town stronger by planting trees.

The Stroad

The Stroad

A stroad is a street/road hybrid. Stroads are dangerous and unproductive, and if we want to build strong towns, we have to eliminate them.

Romancing the Stone Age

Romancing the Stone Age

America's pre-Depression development pattern relied on exploitation of workers, poor living conditions and exclusion of women and minorities. How is the Strong Towns approach, which advocates for traditional development patterns, different?