This week, we are asking those who read, believe in and benefit from Strong Towns to support us by becoming members of the Strong Towns movement. Our small nonprofit is supported primarily through donations from members like you and we need your help to keep doing this important work.

David Kack is a Strong Towns member from Bozeman, MT and today he's sharing the reason he supports Strong Towns.


David Kack

David Kack

For too long, the solution has been to build more: more roads, more bridges, etc. We keep thinking that “just one more lane” will cure our congestion issues. Why are we spending so much money on roads (or lanes) that get used for only a couple of hours a day?

As it's been famously said, “Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again, and expecting a different result.” This could be the slogan for Strong Towns. We have used the same development pattern over and over since the late 1940’s and we've seen what it has done, yet we continue to use the same pattern and principles

As a father of three, all of whom are in college, I worry that my generation is going to stiff them with the tab—that our infrastructure has only begun to decay, and that when it all falls apart, they will be left to pick up the pieces.

They say the first thing to do when digging yourself into a hole is to quit digging. We need to stop digging ourselves into a hole, and to heed the Strong Towns message, and get our collective “house in order.” We must demand that our politicians and leaders only approve fiscally (and environmentally) sustainable developments. We must demand that no more infrastructure is built until we have the funding in place to maintain our existing infrastructure.

We must use the Strong Towns philosophy to guide our decisions on how we move forward in our communities and country, for our decisions will affect our communities (and country) for year to come.

If you care about the future of America's infrastructure and want your town to take a more fiscally sound path forward, you need to be part of Strong Towns.

(Top photo by Chris Waits)


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