Top 5 Recent Stories (June 24–June 28, 2019)

Top 5 Recent Stories (June 24–June 28, 2019)

We’re thrilled to see ideas that have been important to Strong Towns for years reflected in the national conversation, from ending exclusive single-family zoning to the high returns on building walkable neighborhoods. Check out these stories and more, in our top 5 posts of the week.

The Tax Burden Footprint of Tax-Exempt Properties

The Tax Burden Footprint of Tax-Exempt Properties

Tax-exempt properties have a significant fiscal footprint. Do we understand the impacts we create through the too-often wasteful way we design and build public facilities such as city halls, schools, libraries, and parks?

Striding Toward Walkability? 5 Insights About Walkable Urban Places

Striding Toward Walkability? 5 Insights About Walkable Urban Places

Mixed-use, walkable neighborhoods have enduring appeal, are more financially productive than auto-oriented places… and we still don’t allow nearly enough of them to be built. A new study surveys the landscape of walkability in America’s large metropolitan regions.

In Defense of Meter Maids

In Defense of Meter Maids

A recent lawsuit challenged the practice of marking tires with chalk to enforce parking time limits, calling it an illegal search. Be careful what you wish for: our cities just might be forced to start making car owners pay for their use of public space.

Micro-Neighborliness: A Celebration of the Small

Micro-Neighborliness: A Celebration of the Small

Micro-neighborliness (n.): the small, patient, and practical ways that we pivot toward our localities and the people that we share them with. While we do not always hear these stories, the tangible effect that these small acts can have on our places is reason enough to celebrate them.

Do Minimum Lot Size Rules Matter?

Do Minimum Lot Size Rules Matter?

Many cities impose a minimum lot size on residential neighborhoods—which can lead to more expensive housing and less tax revenue to pay for city services. But do these rules actually lead to bigger lots—or do they just reflect what the market would produce anyway? A new study sheds some light on that question.

The Trickle or the Fire Hose

The Trickle or the Fire Hose

Most neighborhoods face a stark choice between the trickle or the fire hose: either virtually no new development or investment, or cataclysmic change that leaves a place unrecognizable. We need to get out of this destructive dichotomy.

The Real Problem With E-Scooters? Cars!

The Real Problem With E-Scooters? Cars!

Scooters are often perceived as a nuisance on public streets. But nearly every problem blamed on them is ultimately a consequence of the way our cities are designed to privilege the movement and storage of cars above all else.