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Marohn

Is Strong Towns NIMBY, YIMBY, or What?

Is Strong Towns NIMBY, YIMBY, or What?

Some YIMBYs don’t like Strong Towns and claim we are anti-development NIMBY. Yet, NIMBYs hate us because we insist neighborhood evolve, adapt, and change. What’s going on here?

Changing America’s Business Model

Changing America’s Business Model

What the Strong Towns movement needs to do is change our cultural understanding about growth, development and the way we invest in our places.

Why Would a Property Owner Oppose Neighborhood Improvements?

Why Would a Property Owner Oppose Neighborhood Improvements?

As an engineer, I once had property owners turn out en masse to oppose a project I was working on that would fix their potholed street and broken sidewalks. Find out why—and one key policy change that might have led to a different response.

Saving Our Historic Water Tower, One Bite at a Time

Saving Our Historic Water Tower, One Bite at a Time

My city council has been offered an impossible choice: spend millions of dollars we don’t have repairing our historic water tower, or permanently destroy an iconic landmark and a piece of our history. But there is a third option.

What to Expect from Strong Towns: the Book

What to Expect from Strong Towns: the Book

The Strong Towns Podcast is back with brand new episodes. And to kick things off, we’re offering you a sneak peek into the upcoming full-length book by Strong Towns founder Charles Marohn—including details of the contents that haven’t yet been shared anywhere else. And you can pre-order your copy today!

Strong Towns and Race

Strong Towns and Race

We have a lot of work ahead at Strong Towns to meaningfully engage people of color and to grow the racial diversity of our movement. We’re committed to doing that work.

Who Benefits From Lower Housing Prices?

Who Benefits From Lower Housing Prices?

It’s hard to have a coherent conversation on affordable housing when most of those involved in the discussion directly benefit from — and in some ways depend on — higher housing prices.

Routine Traffic Stops Should Not Be Used to Fight Violent Crime

Routine Traffic Stops Should Not Be Used to Fight Violent Crime

Using routine traffic stops as a pretext to root out other types of crime is as disingenuous as it is unhelpful. We need to design intuitively safe streets—and then use traffic enforcement for the minority of drivers who are actually driving recklessly.