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Marohn

What to Expect from Strong Towns: the Book

What to Expect from Strong Towns: the Book

The Strong Towns Podcast is back with brand new episodes. And to kick things off, we’re offering you a sneak peek into the upcoming full-length book by Strong Towns founder Charles Marohn—including details of the contents that haven’t yet been shared anywhere else. And you can pre-order your copy today!

Strong Towns and Race

Strong Towns and Race

We have a lot of work ahead at Strong Towns to meaningfully engage people of color and to grow the racial diversity of our movement. We’re committed to doing that work.

Who Benefits From Lower Housing Prices?

Who Benefits From Lower Housing Prices?

It’s hard to have a coherent conversation on affordable housing when most of those involved in the discussion directly benefit from — and in some ways depend on — higher housing prices.

Routine Traffic Stops Should Not Be Used to Fight Violent Crime

Routine Traffic Stops Should Not Be Used to Fight Violent Crime

Using routine traffic stops as a pretext to root out other types of crime is as disingenuous as it is unhelpful. We need to design intuitively safe streets—and then use traffic enforcement for the minority of drivers who are actually driving recklessly.

Announcing Strong Towns: The Book

Announcing Strong Towns: The Book

Strong Towns has been an international movement for change for over ten years. Now, it’s becoming a book—and this fall, we’re embarking on a continent-wide tour to promote it.

You Get What You Tax For

You Get What You Tax For

The property tax punishes modest improvements and rewards steady decline. People who take steps to add value to their property pay more taxes, while slumlords and speculators pay less. There are a lot of reasons for cities to switch to a tax on land value, and more states should allow cities to make that change.

Modern Monetary Theory and the End of Recessions

Modern Monetary Theory and the End of Recessions

Modern Monetary Theory suggests that recessions can be avoided – along with lots of unnecessary pain – if policymakers will commit the resources to preempt them. Sounds like the same promise the Forest Service made fighting fires last century.