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Walkability

When It Snows, Whose Mobility Matters?

When It Snows, Whose Mobility Matters?

Even in cities that tout their commitment to walkability, once it snows, those who walk (and roll!) often aren’t treated as equally important street users.

The Twelve Days of Safety Myths

The Twelve Days of Safety Myths

Learn to dispel the common myths you hear from transportation agencies with regard to safe streets. The guidance isn’t as sacred as they want you to believe.

We Regulate the Wrong Things

We Regulate the Wrong Things

Most cities’ zoning and development regulations obsess over things that are easy to measure, like building height and density, at the expense of the things that actually determine whether we’re building quality places.

The Failure of "Just Add Water" Urbanism

The Failure of "Just Add Water" Urbanism

To assume that a street-forward, mixed use development will activate a lifeless area is like assuming that gardening is a matter of “just add water.” In reality, different urban environments—like different soils, climates, and plants—require different elements of care.

Rochester and the Curse of Cataclysmic Money

Rochester and the Curse of Cataclysmic Money

These campaigns are the kind of thing that large, out-of-touch bureaucracies do when they want to appear like they are doing something without actually changing anything about what they are doing.

Tell Us About Your Favorite Street

Tell Us About Your Favorite Street

Your town's streets are its vital organs. A great street can make a place, and a badly-designed street can kill a place. We want you to tell us about a street you love that makes your town a stronger, more resilient place.

The Catch-22 of Retrofitting the Suburbs

The Catch-22 of Retrofitting the Suburbs

Two large development projects currently working their way through the public engagement and approvals process illustrate why suburban retrofit is a really tough proposition to stake our future on.

The Activation Energy of a Walkable Place

The Activation Energy of a Walkable Place

Is it magical thinking to expect the transition from car-dependent to walkable places to happen organically? When, and how, do we need a catalyst to jump-start that process?

A LOSing Proposition

A LOSing Proposition

By overemphasizing vehicle Level of Service (LOS) we justify expensive, overbuilt streets that are dangerously inhospitable to people—just so drivers won’t be inconvenienced during peak travel times.

What Makes A Place Walkable

What Makes A Place Walkable

Walkability is a word urbanists throw around, often with different ideas as to what it really means, or why we care about it. Let’s take a look at how safety, distance, convenience, and comfort affect it.